THE STORY OF ONE FAMILY'S JOURNEY WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES AND CELIAC DISEASE.
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Friday, June 3, 2011

"I'm thirsty."

"Mama, I want to take a warm bath."

Well, whatever.  We live in the desert.  There's no such thing as cold water these days, so I guess a WARM bath it is.

"Me too."

"I want to take a bubble bath."

Okay.  Fine.  All three of you go take your WARM/BUBBLE baths or whatever.  I really don't care.  I'm going to make some gluten free pancakes so I can feed you breakfast, and then we're off to the grocery store.

Ring Ring.

"Hi.  It's the library.  We have that movie your daughter asked us to put on hold for her."

Oh?  She's requesting library holds on her own now?  Next she'll be completely in charge of her diabetes or something.  Sheesh!

Okay.  I'm going to make pancakes, you all are going to take a warm/bubble bath, then we're going to stop by the library, before going to the grocery store.

"I need help with my pump."


"I want braids."


"I don't want braids."


"I want to wear that shirt."


"I want the red plate."


"I want another pancake."

Beep. Beep.

What's beeping?  No beeping. THERE IS NO BEEPING ALLOWED.

Beep. Beep.

"I can't find my shoes."


"I want that book."


"MOM!!!!!!  She has my special stuffed dog!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

Beep.  Beep.

OH!  The meter.  Somehow the bolus from breakfast was interrupted...needs another unit. Fine. Point and shoot.  Done.  This reminds me that I need to stop by my new doctor's office to make an appointment.

Okay.  Baths are done, pancakes are done, now we need to swing by the office to grab a card and make an appointment, stop by the library, and go to the grocery store.

Somewhere around....oh, I don't know....three hours since the charade began, we're all in the car.

"I'm thirsty."

Of course you are.  We've been in the car for 5 minutes.  It would have been impossible to have been thirsty 5 minutes ago, while we were standing in the kitchen.  I always bring a big cup of ice water when I get in the car, so I pass it back.  And they pass it around, arguing about who is getting the longest sip.  Eventually I get it back.

Moving on.

"Mom, I'm still thirsty."


"I think I'm high."

Remove sugar stuff from the mom bag -- pass it back.  Pass back water.

"High glucose."

What is that?  I've never seen that on her meter before.  Thinking back to somewhere in a manual...ohhhhhh...it means her blood sugar is greater than 600!

SIX (effing) HUNDRED????

Heart racing.

"Mom.  This feels worse than a normal high.  My head hurts.  I don't like it.  Mom something is really wrong.  I feel really yucky."  

She's starts crying.

I pull into a parking lot.  We're changing the site.  NOW.  She's arguing.  I'm not.

She's having a meltdown.  Crying that she's so miserable.

23 units left.  At least 12 to prime.  Plus I have to fill cannula.  And give a correction.

Lord help us.

The other two are falling apart.

I'm on the verge of falling apart.

I was so mad.  In that moment, I was spewing four letter words in my mind.  I could feel rage seething out of every pour. I wanted wrangle diabetes' neck.  I was furious.

I maneuvered over car seats, and crying kids, but got that site in.  FOUR UNIT correction.  FOUR????  I felt nauseated delivering it.

It took me an ENTIRE morning just to get everyone in the car.  And now THIS?  A blood sugar of 600+ could KILL her.

Just like that.  Life changes on a dime.  You think you're moving right along, then BAM!

"High glucose"

Fortunately her daddy was close.  He was on his way home with an ear infection (okay, maybe we're falling apart).  He met us in the parking lot, took her home, and dealt with the rest.

The other two and I pressed onward to make my doctor's appointment, swing by the library, and go to the grocery store.

It's all normal now.

You'd never know.

Except, of course, for the fact that I'm blogging it....AND....we have our endo appointment today.

Figures.


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21 comments:

  1. Wouldn't you know the exact moment I'm blogging about a low you are about hi.

    I did amazing.3 of them and a600!? You rock.

    I'm sorry sher felt so icky. D sucks !!!

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  2. BRUTAL! you dealt with it like a champ though! Its posts like this that teach us to never underestimate the power of the evil D

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  3. Every time I read you pieces like this -- with all the demands -- and this time the emergency thrown in -- I can't help but think how often we go through this at our house. Very relatable, Wendy. And, you must have been a little out of your mind when you realized you had such a high blood sugar on your hands. Roselady

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  4. :( Awful, just awful. It's good that she recognized that her sugars were high. Poor kid, and poor mom! Hope you never have to see another "High Glucose" on the meter again.

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  5. 600's happen. You acted quickly, without freaking out in front of her - you did exactly what needed to be done.

    Please don't beat yourself up about it. You were (and are) great!

    Hugs to you all.

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  6. Stories like that always take me right back to diagnosis day. It's so scary that life can change in one moment. I'm so glad that everything turned out ok and that she is on the mend.

    I think you deserve that bubblebath now!!!!!

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  7. BAM Should be the DOC's word, not Emeril's! It's so fitting, because that's how things happen. All is well until - BAM! - it's not.

    Glad to hear you're back on track. Hope today is a BAM-free day!!!

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  8. Oh dear....now that is a morning from h-e-double hockey sticks! Poor Sugar...I can't imagine how awful she must have felt with her BG that high. I hope she is feeling better!

    And man, I can TOTALLY relate to the "I'm thirsty" in the car thing. I just drove to Pinetop/Lakeside with the kids (alone!) and I swear, it took us like 4 hours due to all the pee stops/blood sugar checks and even a site change in the McDonalds parking lot. Everything takes longer with kids AND D!

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  9. How did you get that picture of me on your blog??? :)

    Uh... It always reRs it's hed at the most inopportune times. Although, really any time is annoying. Poor Sugar. I hope she is feeling better!

    Way to go wonder woman!! Other folks would never know the hysterics going on inside of us, would they?!?

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  10. Oh, I so feel you! It's usually 'I have to go to the bathroom' before we reach the end of the street...like she didn't have to go a minute ago when she was putting her shoes on right by the flippin bathroom!!!
    At least Dad was there to take her home...and they could commiserate together while you got done what had to get done!
    Big HUGS!!!

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  11. "Calgon take us away"!!! (but really, could we ever take a bubble bath without wondering who's doing our job while we're in there?) sigh...

    Man, what a day! I commend you for keeping those four letter words IN your head...I epically fail, as of late, to keep them to myself.

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  12. Thats so sad. Being a PWD, this is heartbreaking because you really do feel like crap, and from the caregiver side YOU feel like crap because it happens so fast. Hugs to you friend. The sad part about D is it really is an invisible illness. A lot of times no one knows the HELL you go through! Hang in there Super D Mama! You Rock! :)

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  13. Good grief, I know the three hour charade! And the thirsty, have to pee, hungry, right after you get in the car? Makes you want to roar. So sorry she was high-it is always unexpected. You held those words in and handled it. Way to go! : )

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  14. Nothing like D showing up uninvited on an already crazy busy day!

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  15. What a day! Funny how you can make it sound just like my days with your commentary Wendy. Thanks for this, it makes me feel less alone in the craziness of life with "D" in the mix.

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  16. My lord! I'm exhausted just reading that!! You must be incredibly patient. Your family is totally lucky to have you.

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  17. What a crazy morning! Glad things were able to settle down. So miserable when their sugar makes them feel so lousy! And scary too with a high like that! Glad you were able to manage the site change and get her home with daddy...and you were able to finish your errands too!

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  18. Oh honey, that sucks - for all of you. I can't imagine how cruddy she must have felt. (Well, actually, I kinda can. And YUCK!!) You, my friend, are amazing - for all that you do and all that you deal with.

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  19. Mornings like that just drain me. Glad J could give you a hand. (((HUGS)))

    Lora (google is REALLY starting to piss me off)

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  20. oh my I feel your pain. we had a "hi" one time and I was so upset. You did a great job and you make me feel better explaing your morning... that is NORMAL in our house... I hope your day gets much better

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  21. oh, what a morning...I hope the rest of the day and doctor appts went well. And the pancakes sound absolutely delicious this AM :)

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While I'm happy to share our experiences with what works, and what doesn't work, for the management of Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease in our house, please do not mistake anything you read here for medical advice. Decisions regarding your/your child's health care should be made only with the assistance of your medical care team. Use any information from this blog at your own risk.