THE STORY OF ONE FAMILY'S JOURNEY WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES AND CELIAC DISEASE.
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Saturday, November 19, 2011

VIP

World Diabetes Day was November 14th.  Coincidentally, Sugar was VIP of the Week in her class, beginning on the same day.  Coming off her camp high, she was very excited to share the crafts she made with her classmates.


The next day, the school called when her blood sugar was 400-something before her morning snack.  This was after 400-somethings all night.

So I packed up her stuff and went to the school to change her site (again).  I could tell all those high blood sugars were really taking their toll.  She looked tired and tearful.  She was frustrated and sluggish.  And she told me her throat hurt.

DING DING!

I took her home and got her in to the pediatrician.

Strep.

The 400-somethings persisted, and she was steadily feeling worse at first.  It took 2 days before she was finally feeling better...but, even still, her blood sugars were still pretty whack.  Like...REALLY WHACK!

By the time she could go back to school, we were submerged in her make-up work, and forgot about her being the special VIP.  On Fridays, the VIP is supposed to bring a treat to share with the class.

Ar ten minutes to 1, I remembered, but it was already almost snack time!  Jason ran to the store to get some sugar cookies while I cut a chunk of gluten-free sugar cookie dough off the stash I keep in the freezer (you never know when you'll need a sugar cookie, especially during this time of year!).


While waiting for her cookie to bake, I emailed her teacher to let her know that the cookies would be on their way stat.  She emailed me right back explaining that the class treat could be rescheduled for an hour later.

After pulling it out of the oven, Jason rushed them all to the school.  In the midst of the chaos, we didn't communicate with each other clearly.  He tested and dosed her when she came to the office to pick them up, thinking the class was ready to eat.  (I mean, I had rushed around like a crazed maniac, trying to get something figured out.)  

Oh what a predicament!  She had been dosed...and her basals had been drastically increased....BUT cookies weren't happening for another hour...

I had no other choice, but to contact her teacher again to explain that she HAD to eat her cookie, and couldn't wait an hour.

So, my VIP at her cookie -- alone.  

It stung my heart.  I was sad that she wasn't going to be beaming at her table, enjoying her special VIP treat with everyone else.  

But this is just how things go sometimes.  No matter how hard you try to schedule and accommodate every last detail, sometimes things still go awry.  Sometimes cookies can't wait, because her life revolves around insulin...and insulin doesn't care that the class treat had been rescheduled.

By the time school was out, it seemed that she hardly noticed what had happened.  When I picked her up, she was happy and excited about seeing her friends after being at home for a few days.  She was thrilled that I had remembered her special snack, and full of anticipation for an after-shool birthday party.

She didn't miss a beat.

That's my girl...a genuine VIP through and through :)

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2 comments:

  1. VIP indeed! Love that you have cookie dough at the ready...what an awesome mom!!
    Yeah, so she had the cookie early, but she obviously loved it just the same.
    I get it...it hurts a mom's heart when our kids can't be just like everyone else. Yes, we treasure their differences, but some of those differences are hard to treasure sometimes!

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Life For A Child Button 2
While I'm happy to share our experiences with what works, and what doesn't work, for the management of Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease in our house, please do not mistake anything you read here for medical advice. Decisions regarding your/your child's health care should be made only with the assistance of your medical care team. Use any information from this blog at your own risk.