THE STORY OF ONE FAMILY'S JOURNEY WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES AND CELIAC DISEASE.
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Monday, August 15, 2011

504 -- Check.



I dropped of my younger two with a neighbor, before hustling to get Sugar and I to the school.

We walked in, signed the visitor log, and took a seat.

I could hardly believe it was time again.  Time to gather the troops to make sure everyone is on the same page. Time to run though the checks and balances.  Time to review the battle plan.

One by one, they began showing up.


The Vice Principle.
The Librarian.
The Music Teacher.
The Art Teacher.
Both PE Teachers.
The School Nurse.
The Health Assistant.
All three second grade teachers.
Her 1st grade teacher.


And us...my girl and me.


Gathered around a big conference table, I took the lead with a short explanation of what Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease is, and asked if anyone had any questions.


Our school district instituted a new computerized system for managing 504 meetings, and the Vice Principle had meticulously gone through the entire document to make sure each detail was in place.  We passed out copies, and started at the top.


Questions were thoughtful and relevant.  The team covered every detail, and we went in circles until each base was covered, and everyone felt comfortable.  Here's a few highlights: 

  • Instead of stashing supplies in various places around the school, she carries a little backpack that contains everything she needs (including Glucagon).  By doing this, she will always have access to what she needs, and will also be prepared for unexpected situations, such as  lockdowns, fire drills, or other emergencies.  The teacher keeps a little hook next to the door, and she puts her bag there, making sure to grab it whenever she leaves the classroom.  It goes back and forth between home and school everyday.
  • If she alerts someone that she is feeling low, the school nurse or health aid should be called to come to her.  At no time will she be left alone.  Only an adult may accompany her during a blood sugar problem, but she can go to the Health Office for routine diabetes care with another student, as long as there aren't any signs of a blood sugar issue.
  • Sugar gets pre-bolused, so it is understood by everyone (INCLUDING HER!) that she must finish all of her snacks and meals. 
  •  She will test her blood sugar and eat a 20 carb snack before P.E (which, conveniently, happens to fall 2 hours after lunch twice a week -- and ends 10 minutes before I will arrive to pick her up).  

To be honest, this is the FIFTH year that we've gone through this.


Yes.


I said FIFTH.


Once for preschool, twice for kindergarten (I opted to hold her back a year, because she has a summer birthday), and last year.


That brings us to right now.


Second grade.


Sooooooo, I should be an old pro, right?


Pffffffffft....HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA!!!!  YEAH RIGHT!


I have to admit that it's easier the 5th time around.  But I'm still nervous.  I'm still afraid I'll forget to send in something important.  I'm still anxious about how a daily routine will be established with her new schedule.  I'm still freaked out about troubleshooting the inevitable pump setting changes.  I'm still scared out of my mind that she'll have the worst low EVer, and I won't be there to catch it.


I dunno if all that stuff ever goes away.


But I do know that we're as ready as we're ever going to be.


So let's do this.
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10 comments:

  1. Sounds like you're ready! It's such a comfort to know that God's watching out for our girls even when we can't! Way to rock the 504 meeting.

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  2. I'm worried right along with all of you guys that have to send your babies off to school with D in tow. It's got to be so scary. So many what ifs. I hope she has an uneventful year! It's good to know they are at least all on board with coming together to listen and learn and hear the plan. Hope all goes well.

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  3. And sooo it begins! ;)

    It will be ok! Promise. Its scary each time though isn't it?

    Js school can't have all the teachers present because of the schedules and their contracts. Such bs. Luckily his principal rocks so I will go and meet them on my own. Sounds like you've got it all taken care of :)

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  4. Oh, to long for the days pre-504s when parents just had to be constantly on the ball and ever-diligent without having everything mapped out in a document so all school officials can clearly see what's needed... Oh, wait. Hmm. I see. And so, it is as it was. Fifth year, you ARE a pro Wendy! Keep up the awesomeness and doing what's needed. Sounds like she's in great hands, with you on the ball.

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  5. I'm sure no matter how many times you go through this, you feel it is impt. to do it again and do it right...it's a lot of weight to carry...sounds like she is set up well. Having the backback at all times is a great idea.

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  6. Sounds like you covered everything very well and I wish you all a great school year with NO scary lows. HUGS to you!

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  7. You are on top of things Wendy! I wish you a great start to the new year with stable blood sugars.

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  8. I'm so glad you had such great representation! And I'm sure you rocked it!!

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  9. Sounds like the meeting went well! Glad she's in good hands. Hoping for a great school year for both of us...mine is entering Driver's Ed...YIKES! :)

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  10. Its crazy how busy I feel this time of year. All the little details that go into starting school on top of the regular ones like supplies and new sox and underwear.

    I'm exhausted already and we don't start for another week.

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While I'm happy to share our experiences with what works, and what doesn't work, for the management of Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease in our house, please do not mistake anything you read here for medical advice. Decisions regarding your/your child's health care should be made only with the assistance of your medical care team. Use any information from this blog at your own risk.