THE STORY OF ONE FAMILY'S JOURNEY WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES AND CELIAC DISEASE.
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Wednesday, January 19, 2011

90 - 105 - 125 - 117

The numbers that make a mother's Candy Heart sing.
All is well.
Blissfully well.

These beautifully patterned numbers can only mean one thing:
SuperBolus success.
combined with
Lunch spike striked.

Victory.
Glory.
DEFEAT!

So, raise that glass of Crystal Light, my dear child.
And then hand over Dexcom so I can bask in this momentary conquest.

I can just see the picture now:
A beautiful 12 hour straight line...topped off with a stable arrow indicating perfect continuity...

It will radiate distinction.
It will glow.
IT.  WILL.  BE.  GRAND!


Or not.

What     is     THAT?

Shark's teeth?
A spike over 250 after breakfast?
77 with an arrow trending downward?
And what's up with the questionable double spike thing-a-ma-jig after lunch?

REALLY?

You know....
Sometimes ignorance really is bliss.

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12 comments:

  1. Blah! Information is good! Too much information is sucky! Super bolus rocks! Bask in your glory anyway, don't let Dex take your steam!

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  2. Ditto for what Meri said, I am sure your babe felt wonderful too by not being too high or too low for any extreme length of time.

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  3. I know the feeling. I think the very most important function of my Dexter is the arrow. At first I was so "caught up in the numbers" but them I just said meh, and realized that if most numbers are between the lines, and by the looks of yours, you are doing super awesome! Hang in there! You are awesome! :0

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  4. Definetly too much information! Apidra? I for one, would ignore the shark teeth. :)

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  5. Hi girls! You all ROCK! I am super new to diabetes. I'm still working on a slide scale.lol For the knowlege that you all have to learn to operate a pump, you should be paid a doctor's salary!

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  6. Ah...I think your trend graph looks damn good girl! I am too embarassed to show you guys a "day-in-the-life" of Joe's. It can be down right ugly!

    Ignorance = BLISS (sometimes)

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  7. I think it's gorgeous and agree with Kelly - ignore the sharks teeth. But I also agree with you - sometimes ignorance is bliss. But then I agree with Meri, information is good! Knowledge is power. lol

    It truly warms my heart that Mr. Walsh's Super Bolus is proving useful for so many. Now we just need the option automated in our pumps!

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  8. It 'looks' crazy, but really none of those numbers are really that high or low. It sort of makes me not even interested in knowing what it would look like if Camden used one though! Maybe the reason I don't freak out much is because I don't have to see the shark teeth!

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  9. new to the blog. love it! We don't have a CGM, but I often wonder what it would look like in between checks. So interesting.

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  10. This is the best CGM post I've seen. Makes me glad we can't afford one. :P Sometimes too much information is a bad thing!

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  11. Ah Wendy! I so have a love-hate relationship with our CGM too. I am finally at the place of not beating myself up over the sharks teeth, and focusing on what information I need to get from it today.

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  12. I think that's why we were flabbergasted when a recent A1c came back really high. Her average seemed like we were doing great.

    And then a week with the iPro revealed a late night spike and a spike after afternoon snack.

    At least we were able to identify the problems and hopefully correct them. (We're still working on that!)

    I'm so OCD that I often wonder if having a CGM would make me crazy. Then again at 2am I wish for one because maybe it would alarm is she was way too high or way to low.

    I can't win!

    Thanks for posting the numbers and the graph.

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P.S. (Moderation has been enabled due to mega-spamming sugar cubes.)

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While I'm happy to share our experiences with what works, and what doesn't work, for the management of Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease in our house, please do not mistake anything you read here for medical advice. Decisions regarding your/your child's health care should be made only with the assistance of your medical care team. Use any information from this blog at your own risk.