THE STORY OF ONE FAMILY'S JOURNEY WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES AND CELIAC DISEASE.
Life For A Child Button 2

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

A REAL Deep Post About Perfection

I'm a big fan of keeping things real.

In my 20's, I walked away from the organized religion I was raised in because I felt like I was constantly being judged by fake people. As an adult, I could clearly see that going to church had become a big popularity contest week after week.  It was an opportunity for fake people to plaster fake smiles across their faces and tell fake tales of fake happiness.  Everyone was trying to see who would be victorious with the fake crown of most fake perfect life.

As a little girl, I remember Sunday School lessons from church doctrines telling me over and over that I must strive to be perfect.  Nothing short of perfection would ever be acceptable. This message left me without hope, because I knew I couldn't ever live up to the standard.  I wasn't perfect.  Therefore, God wouldn't ever love me.

What I've learned since leaving, is that those teachings were wrong.  God never said He wanted perfect children. He loves us, despite our imperfections.

I'm so thankful I was able to figure this out before I allowed my own daughters to receive these teachings and fall into the trap of believing that perfection is an essential element to attaining Heaven.

I just read a message that touched me on a very deep level.  For the record, it has nothing to do with religion. 

It has everything to do with being human.

I'm thankful that someone found it and took the time to share it with me.  So I thought I'd share it with you.


Follow Me on Pinterest

8 comments:

  1. How funny... I just shared the same post on my blog. Loved what he had to say about it and I think everyone could benefit from reading it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It is a great article. I read it earlier today and it is so relevant to many recent discussions I have had with my kids. Thanks for sharing Wendy!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm glad you posted this. Just read the Single Dad Laughing post.

    The other day, Madeline was illustrating a poem for school. I thought her art looked great. According to her, she goofed. She wanted the illstration to be "perfect." That lead to whole discussion on being perfect and striving for perfection. That SDL post reminds me of that talk, and makes me realize I need to keep talking to my kids about such stuff. Perfection is not something to strive for!!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. OH......MY...... GOSH!!!

    Did you live my life!? I could have just ripped this page from my journal!! I was part of a very strict religion that said you were never perfect enough! I finally had the courage to leave in my 20's but a lot of people don't know about it. When I left, I realized I was "perfect" the way I am right this very moment, despite any wrong doings, and mishaps! The relief from not feeling that way has made me such a better person, because with perfection comes judgement. Oh my, I have goosebumps! All I can say is GOOD FOR YOU, because that really takes courage!

    Thank you SOOOO much for sharing this! It just makes my heart happy!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Love it! Mind if I post it on facebook to share?

    ReplyDelete
  6. thanks Wendy, I really appreciate this post you have no idea.

    cheers to imperfection!

    ReplyDelete
  7. The world is filled with fake people who demand perfection, and they are not always found in a church. They can be found everywhere!

    ReplyDelete
  8. great post. Thanks for sharing it was very meaningful to me.

    ReplyDelete

Candy Comment Love!

P.S. (Moderation has been enabled due to mega-spamming sugar cubes.)

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Life For A Child Button 2
While I'm happy to share our experiences with what works, and what doesn't work, for the management of Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease in our house, please do not mistake anything you read here for medical advice. Decisions regarding your/your child's health care should be made only with the assistance of your medical care team. Use any information from this blog at your own risk.